How to Repair Squeaky Wood Floors - This Old House

author This Old House   4 год. назад
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How to Patch a Chipped Wood Floor

Watch the full episode: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/watch/ask-toh-walkway-reset-chipped-floor Ask This Old House general contractor Tom Silva patches a chipped wood floor using a Dutchman and hand tools. Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thisoldhouse Time: 4 hours Cost: $50 Skill Level: Moderate Tools List for Patching a Wood Floor: Drill Block plane Hand saw Utility knife Chisel Forstner bit (optional) Shopping List: Polyurethane glue Wood glue Rags Floorboard (same type as rest of floor) Prestain Stain Painters tape Polyurethane Steps: 1. Drill a hole through the chipped part of the floor using a countersink bit. Drop a little bit of water in the hole, then add some polyurethane glue. 2. Drive a screw through the hole, securing the floorboard back to the floor. 3. If you saved the chipped piece of the floor, you can glue it back on the floor with wood glue. Be sure to cover all the exposed wood with glue before re-securing the patch. 4. Wipe off any excess glue on the patch with a wet rag. 5. If you don’t have the chipped piece or it doesn’t fit back into the hole perfectly, you’ll need to make a Dutchman. Examine the floorboard and find a section of it that matches the grain around the rest of the floor boards near the chip. 6. True up the edge of the floorboard chosen for the patch using a block plane. 7. Cut the patch roughly to size using a hand saw. First, rip the patch to rough width. Then rip the patch in half so it’s half the thickness of the floorboard. 8. Square one end of the Dutchman using the block plane. 9. Hold the Dutchman up to the section of the floor requiring the patch. Mark the length just slightly past where the chip ends. 10. Cut the Dutchman to length based on the mark. 11. Hold the Dutchman over the chip. Trace around the outside of the patch using the utility knife. 12. Chisel out the outlined section of the floor roughly the thickness of the patch. To save time, you can use a drill with a forstner bit and then switch to the hand chisel for fine tuning. 13. Pitch the Dutchman at an angle and shave off a little bevel on each side with the block plane so the patch will fit easier in the floor. 14. Once the Dutchman fits the hole, prestain it with a rag. Let the stain sit for about five minutes. 15. Stain the Dutchman with a rag. Let it dry for a few minutes. 16. Apply wood glue to the hole in the floor. Make sure all the raw wood is covered with glue. Wipe off excess glue with a rag. 17. Tape around the patch and let it sit overnight. After about 24 hours, add a few coats of polyurethane until the patch blends in with the rest of the floor. Resources: Everything Tom used for this project, including the hand saw, block plane, utility knife, and stain, can be found at home centers. Tom used flooring saved by the homeowner, but flooring can also be found at home centers, lumber yards, and flooring retailers. For a patch, use the same type of wood and look for a piece that has a similar grain to the floor being patched. Tom secured the Dutchman to the floor using wood glue and polyurethane glue, both manufactured by Gorilla Glue (http://www.gorillatough.com/). The workbench Tom made the Dutchman on is manufactured by Kreg (https://www.kregtool.com/). Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisOldHouse Twitter: https://twitter.com/thisoldhouse https://twitter.com/asktoh Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/thisoldhouse/ G+: https://plus.google.com/+thisoldhouse/posts Instagram: http://instagram.com/thisoldhouse Tumblr: http://thisoldhouse.tumblr.com/

How to Choose and Use Foam Insulation - This Old House

This Old House general contractor Tom Silva explains the wide world of spray-foam insulation. Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thisoldhouse Full episode: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rETV6HAY_NI&index=14&list=PLkJADc1qDrr8JnEkf1GX2utInAXW6t2XP How to Install Fiberglass Insulation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWQpsbILOPs&index=54&list=PLkJADc1qDrr_0NxtmzECiOWkr5de82kXV How to Install a Dehumidifier Pump: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HJwFgi3D-6g&index=7&list=PLkJADc1qDrr_0NxtmzECiOWkr5de82kXV How to Repair a Cracked Drywall Ceiling: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Btkt0F7O-O8&index=8&list=PLkJADc1qDrr_0NxtmzECiOWkr5de82kXV Follow This Old House: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisOldHouse Twitter: https://twitter.com/thisoldhouse Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/thisoldhouse/ G+: https://plus.google.com/+thisoldhouse/posts Instagram: http://instagram.com/thisoldhouse Tumblr: http://thisoldhouse.tumblr.com/

Hardwood floor refinishing by trial and error

Using a small handheld belt sander to refinish a floor, gap filling with shims, getting it smooth and free of specs and bumps. http://woodgears.ca/home/floor_refinish.html I learned along the way and show some of my mistakes. Not everything I tried turned out to be a good idea. But the floor turned out good, just more work than it could have been. For a while I had comments disabled. Over 1000 comments, but really it was mostly different version of the same two negative comments over and over "you should have rented a sander", and "you should have hired a professional". Both of which are already addressed at the end of the video. You can see this floor again in my domino machine video: https://youtu.be/N1-wU9NgsV4?t=5m37s

How-To Fix Loose & Hollow Tile Floors: Don't Remove or Replace! Just Drill & Fill!

How-To Fix Your Loose & Hollow Tile Floors- No Removal Necessary! Just Drill & Fill! Fast, Easy & Affordable! www.fixafloorworldwide.com To Fix Your Floor Today!

How to Create a Dutch Door

Watch the full episode: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/watch/ask-toh-dutch-door-landscape-checkers Ask This Old House general contractor Tom Silva converts a regular door into a Dutch door. Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thisoldhouse Time: 3 hours Cost: $100 Skill Level: Moderate Tools List for Creating a Dutch Door: Pencil Safety glasses Chisel Utility knife Drill Track saw Palm sander Shopping List: Hinges (with screws) Barrel latch Scrap cardboard Scrap wood for Filler Wood glue Wood screws 80-100 grit sandpaper Steps: 1. With the door still hung in the jamb, mark where the cut for Dutch door will be. Use that as a guide to mark for 2 additional hinges above and below the cut mark. 2. Mortise the door where the new hinges will go with a chisel. Scoring around the mark with a utility knife can help prevent the door from chipping or cracking. 3. Once the hinges can fit flush against the door, attach the hinges to the door using a drill and screws. 4. With the new hinges attached to the door, trace where the hinges will attach to the jamb. Mortise the jamb and attach the other side of the hinges the same as earlier. 5. Replace the old hinges with new ones so that all four hinges match. If the old hinges are thicker than the new ones, add a filler piece of scrap cardboard behind both hinges before installing. 6. Remove the door from the jamb. 7. Cut two pieces of scrap wood the width of the door and taper them on opposite sides. 8. Cut the door in half with the track saw to fit the tapered filler pieces. 9. Attach one filler piece to the bottom of the top half of the door using wood glue and screws. 10. Rehang the top half of the door, then the bottom. With the door in place, attach the second filler piece to the top of the bottom half of the door and adjust as necessary with a palm sander. 11. Install a barrel latch to the top and bottom halves of the door to lock the top half of the door. Resources: Everything Tom used for this project, including the chisel, utility knife, hole saw, hinges, and latches can be found at home centers. Tom used wood glue and polyurethane glue, manufactured by Gorilla Glue (https://www.gorillatough.com/) The track saw Tom used is manufactured by Festool (https://www.festoolusa.com/) Expert assistance for this project was provided by Woodcraft (https://www.woodcraft.com/). Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisOldHouse Twitter: https://twitter.com/thisoldhouse https://twitter.com/asktoh Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/thisoldhouse/ G+: https://plus.google.com/+thisoldhouse/posts Instagram: http://instagram.com/thisoldhouse Tumblr: http://thisoldhouse.tumblr.com/

This Old House general contractor Tom Silva silences some squeaky floors. (See below for a shopping list and tools.)

Full episode: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6KEmetJOeE&list=PLkJADc1qDrr-UizPmo33kfL3ed8Jmt6Ja&index=8

How to Repair Squeaky Floors Through Carpeting: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gUW-IhSMBc

How to Strip a Hardwood Floor: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2SVs1g0EfII

How to Refinish Hardwood Floors: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qO12ow6N6SY

Shopping List for How to Repair Squeaky Wood Floors:
- 2-inch (6d) finishing nails
- counter-Snap breakaway screws
- wood filler stick

Tools for How to Repair Squeaky Wood Floors:
- drill/driver fitted with ⅛-inch-diameter drill bit

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