Think Fast, Talk Smart: Communication Techniques

author Stanford Graduate School of Business   4 год. назад
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Think Fast. Talk Smart | Matt Abrahams | TEDxMontaVistaHighSchool

Stanford lecturer and entrepreneur Matt Abrahams is an expert on interpersonal communication and presentation. His talk at TEDxMontaVistaHighSchool's 2015 Spring conference explains the ins and outs of impromptu and public speaking. Matt Abrahams is a passionate, collaborative and innovative educator and coach. Matt teaches both Strategic Communication and Effective Communication at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business. Matt is also Co-Founder and Principal at Bold Echo Communications Solutions, a presentation and communication skills company based in Silicon Valley that helps people improve their presentation skills. Matt has worked with executives to help prepare and present keynote addresses and IPO road shows, conduct media interviews, and deliver TED talks. Finally, Matt recently published the second edition of his book Speaking Up Without Freaking Out, a book written to help people become more confident, authentic, and compelling presenters. Prior to teaching, Matt held senior leadership positions in several leading software companies, where he created and ran global training and development organizations. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

How to stay calm when you know you'll be stressed | Daniel Levitin

You're not at your best when you're stressed. In fact, your brain has evolved over millennia to release cortisol in stressful situations, inhibiting rational, logical thinking but potentially helping you survive, say, being attacked by a lion. Neuroscientist Daniel Levitin thinks there's a way to avoid making critical mistakes in stressful situations, when your thinking becomes clouded — the pre-mortem. "We all are going to fail now and then," he says. "The idea is to think ahead to what those failures might be." TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector

Most leaders don't even know the game they are in - Simon Sinek at Live2Lead 2016

Trust and cooperation are not standard in our organizations and yet we know they should be. There are two attributes that every single leader has the opportunity to possess that will help them create the types of organizations we would be proud to call our own. Those two attributes are EMPATHY & PERSPECTIVE. Simon Sinek's full keynote from John C. Maxell's Live2Lead event in Atlanta, Georgia, October 7, 2016. Find more tools, resources and ideas to inspire at https://startwithwhy.com.

Speaking English by Prof Sumita Roy at IMPACT SEPT 2015

Free personality development training program to unemployed and underemployed youth

12 Things That Ruin a First Impression Immediately

Scientists have proven that we form our first impression about someone within the first 7 seconds of meeting them, and 55% of the first impression is based on appearance. Pay attention to 12 common things you should avoid not to ruin the first impression. In his research, psychologist William F. Chaplin found that people with a weak handshake are instantly judged as being shy, anxious, uninterested, or even completely incompetent. If you place your hands on the table, don’t squeeze them too tight or lay them flat with your palms down. This makes people feel like you want to control them. Also, don’t forget about the role that culture plays here. A 2007 study showed that people who maintain eye contact during a conversation are often seen as more confident, attentive, intelligent, and trustworthy. Try not to focus the conversation only on yourself and your issues. It’s always a good idea to be attentive to your conversation partner. Tapping can indicate nervousness, irritation, or impatience. People might even think that you’re purposely trying to irritate others or draw attention to yourself. And while cracking your knuckles can help relieve stress, it’s one of the most annoying sounds according to a survey by The New York Times. A study from the University of Essex showed that even just having one’s phone on the table next to them reduces a conversation’s quality and the participants’ engagement. So leave it in your bag or in your pocket. Running late to a meeting with people you don’t know or have a formal relationship with will shed a guaranteed negative light on you. You’ll seem like an unreliable and unorganized person that doesn’t respect people enough to value their time. Music: About That Oldie Vibe Tracks Josefina Quincas Moreira Merengue de Limon Quincas Moreira Pink Lemonade Silent Partner https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music TIMESTAMPS A weak handshake 0:38 Keeping your hands in the wrong position 1:25 Chewing gum 2:15 Avoiding eye-contact 3:01 Playing with your hair 3:41 Picking the wrong conversation topics 4:25 Invading someone’s personal space 5:07 Making distracting noises 5:49 Constantly checking your phone 6:34 Forgetting people’s names 7:23 Being late 8:00 The wrong attire 8:47 SUMMARY -If you wanna give the right impression of confidence and capability, remember to grip the other person’s hand firmly and for no longer than 2 seconds. -Put your hands on your lap if you want, but never keep them in your pockets because this gives the impression that you’re hiding something. -Chewing on gum makes you look immature, self-centered, and somewhat low-brow. -Don't be afraid to lock eyes with another person from time to time instead of constantly looking around, especially when you meet them for the first time. -If you tend to play with your hair when you’re nervous, try to kick this habit, you could be sending them the wrong message. -Play it safe and avoid the general “taboo” topics out there. They include health problems, money, religion, politics, or personal problems and complaints. -When it comes to meeting someone for the first time, keep a minimum of 4 feet between the two of you. -It can be nearly impossible to control nervous tapping, but you have to try, especially during important meetings or presentations. -Even if you’re just checking the time on your screen, it comes off as extremely impolite when you do it during a conversation. -Immediately repeate someone’s name after you’ve been introduced. In case you forget the name, just play it cool and try to avoid using phrases where you have to name the other person. -Leave your house in enough time so that you don’t have to run to your meeting. You’ll be all disheveled and unfocused, and that looks bad too. -If you’re meeting somebody for the very first time, again, especially in more formal situations, try to be conservative in your choice of clothing, be polished, and don’t use heavy perfume or tons of makeup. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/

Communication is critical to success in business and life. Concerned about an upcoming interview? Anxious about being asked to give your thoughts during a meeting? Fearful about needing to provide critical feedback in the moment? You are not alone! Learn and practice techniques that will help you speak spontaneously with greater confidence and clarity, regardless of content and context.

Recorded on October 25, 2014, in collaboration with the Stanford Alumni Association as part of Stanford Reunion Homecoming and the Graduate School of Business Fall Reunion/Alumni Weekend.

Speaker: Matt Abrahams, ’91 Matt Abrahams is a lecturer at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, teaching strategic communication; he also teaches public speaking in Stanford’s Continuing Studies Program.

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