The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse - Bedtime Story (BedtimeStory.TV)

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Town Mouse And The Country Mouse Story - Bedtime Stories - Fairy Tales - 4K UHD - My Pingu Tv

Town Mouse And The Country Mouse Story - Bedtime Stories - Fairy Tales - Fairy Tales For Children - Kids Story - Animation - 4K UHD - My Pingu Tv 💙 Watch More Stories💙 ► The Snow Queen Story - https://youtu.be/H36aJUr0X_g ► Puss in Boots Story - https://youtu.be/Rdwxllu9CqQ ► Aladdin And The Magic Lamp Story - https://youtu.be/LbUB9BSXrzk ► The Musicians of Bremen Story - https://youtu.be/M_yvvPFBNQM ► The Jungle Book Story - https://youtu.be/4674rN23vjg ► Alibaba and 40 Thieves Story - https://youtu.be/m_scvcCPBMg ► Peter Pan Story - https://youtu.be/MEN6HTdzhVg ► Pinocchio Story - https://youtu.be/R6dpoAm19xk ► Three Little Pigs Story - https://youtu.be/r4T28I8oPcM ► Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs Story - https://youtu.be/m6ZJSqkihoY ► Rumpelstiltskin Story - https://youtu.be/4cej-zJ76ns ► The Frog Prince Story - https://youtu.be/yTFtFUJYv1E ► The Wolf and The Seven Kids Story - https://youtu.be/Q1Cv5VOmvvk ► Hansel and Gretel Story - https://youtu.be/Ki8dzg8uZKc ► Cinderella Story - https://youtu.be/H_RikpUMYME ► The Little Red Riding Hood Story - https://youtu.be/QZzflE8HA-0 ► The Little Mermaid Story - https://youtu.be/obwSy38ofTI ► Beauty and The Beast Story - https://youtu.be/GxAXApq361I ► Sleeping Beauty Story - https://youtu.be/CNaBk4QLLGw ► Town Mouse And The Country Mouse Story - https://youtu.be/MDCdK-EPQZ4

The Prince and the Pauper - Bedtime Story (BedtimeStory.TV)

Bedtime Stories for Children (http://www.BedtimeStory.TV) | Best Children Classics HD Subscribe! https://goo.gl/1jQI2H / Play all Stories : http://goo.gl/aekZs1 Download ann play colorings : http://coloring.bedtimestory.tv YouTube channel : http://www.youtube.com/story The Prince and the Pauper Chapter I. The birth of the Prince and the Pauper. In the ancient city of London, on a certain autumn day in the second quarter of the sixteenth century, a boy was born to a poor family of the name of Canty, who did not want him. On the same day another English child was born to a rich family of the name of Tudor, who did want him. All England wanted him too. England had so longed for him, and hoped for him, and prayed God for him, that, now that he was really come, the people went nearly mad for joy. Mere acquaintances hugged and kissed each other and cried. Everybody took a holiday, and high and low, rich and poor, feasted and danced and sang, and got very mellow; and they kept this up for days and nights together. By day, London was a sight to see, with gay banners waving from every balcony and housetop, and splendid pageants marching along. By night, it was again a sight to see, with its great bonfires at every corner, and its troops of revellers making merry around them. There was no talk in all England but of the new baby, Edward Tudor, Prince of Wales, who lay lapped in silks and satins, unconscious of all this fuss, and not knowing that great lords and ladies were tending him and watching over him—and not caring, either. But there was no talk about the other baby, Tom Canty, lapped in his poor rags, except among the family of paupers whom he had just come to trouble with his presence. http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1837/1837-h/1837-h.htm

The Emperor's New Clothes - Bedtime Story (BedtimeStory.TV)

Bedtime Stories for Children (http://www.BedtimeStory.TV) | Best Children Classics HD Subscribe! https://goo.gl/1jQI2H / Play all Stories : http://goo.gl/aekZs1 Download ann play colorings : http://coloring.bedtimestory.tv YouTube channel : http://www.youtube.com/story THE EMPEROR'S NEW CLOTHES Many years ago, there was an Emperor, who was so excessively fond of new clothes, that he spent all his money in dress. He did not trouble himself in the least about his soldiers; nor did he care to go either to the theatre or the chase, except for the opportunities then afforded him for displaying his new clothes. He had a different suit for each hour of the day; and as of any other king or emperor, one is accustomed to say, "he is sitting in council," it was always said of him, "The Emperor is sitting in his wardrobe." Time passed merrily in the large town which was his capital; strangers arrived every day at the court. One day, two rogues, calling themselves weavers, made their appearance. They gave out that they knew how to weave stuffs of the most beautiful colors and elaborate patterns, the clothes manufactured from which should have the wonderful property of remaining invisible to everyone who was unfit for the office he held, or who was extraordinarily simple in character. "These must, indeed, be splendid clothes!" thought the Emperor. "Had I such a suit, I might at once find out what men in my realms are unfit for their office, and also be able to distinguish the wise from the foolish! This stuff must be woven for me immediately." And he caused large sums of money to be given to both the weavers in order that they might begin their work directly. So the two pretended weavers set up two looms, and affected to work very busily, though in reality they did nothing at all. They asked for the most delicate silk and the purest gold thread; put both into their own knapsacks; and then continued their pretended work at the empty looms until late at night. "I should like to know how the weavers are getting on with my cloth," said the Emperor to himself, after some little time had elapsed; he was, however, rather embarrassed, when he remembered that a simpleton, or one unfit for his office, would be unable to see the manufacture. To be sure, he thought he had nothing to risk in his own person; but yet, he would prefer sending somebody else, to bring him intelligence about the weavers, and their work, before he troubled himself in the affair. All the people throughout the city had heard of the wonderful property the cloth was to possess; and all were anxious to learn how wise, or how ignorant, their neighbors might prove to be. "I will send my faithful old minister to the weavers," said the Emperor at last, after some deliberation, "he will be best able to see how the cloth looks; for he is a man of sense, and no one can be more suitable for his office than he is." So the faithful old minister went into the hall, where the knaves were working with all their might, at their empty looms. "What can be the meaning of this?" thought the old man, opening his eyes very wide. "I cannot discover the least bit of thread on the looms." However, he did not express his thoughts aloud... http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1597/1597-h/1597-h.htm#link2H_4_0001

Puss in Boots / The Booted Cat - Bedtime Story (BedtimeStory.TV)

Bedtime Stories for Children (http://www.BedtimeStory.TV) | Best Children Classics HD Subscribe! https://goo.gl/1jQI2H / Play all Stories : http://goo.gl/aekZs1 Download ann play colorings : http://coloring.bedtimestory.tv YouTube channel : http://www.youtube.com/story The Master Cat (The Booted Cat); or, Puss in Boots There was a miller, who left no more estate to the three sons he had, than his Mill, his Ass, and his Cat. The partition was soon made. Neither the scrivener nor attorney were sent for. They would soon have eaten up all the poor patrimony. The eldest had the Mill, the second the Ass, and the youngest nothing but the Cat. The poor young fellow was quite comfortless at having so poor a lot. "My brothers," said he, "may get their living handsomely enough, by joining their stocks together; but for my part, when I have eaten up my Cat, and made me a muff of his skin, I must die with hunger." The Cat, who heard all this, but made as if he did not, said to him with a grave and serious air: "Do not thus afflict yourself, my good master; you have only to give me a bag, and get a pair of boots made for me, that I may scamper thro' the dirt and the brambles, and you shall see that you have not so bad a portion of me as you imagine." Tho' the Cat's master did not build very much upon what he said, he had however often seen him play a great many cunning tricks to catch rats and mice; as when he used to hang by the heels, or hide himself in the meal, and make[70] as if he were dead; so that he did not altogether despair of his affording him some help in his miserable condition. When the Cat had what he asked for, he booted himself very gallantly; and putting his bag about his neck, he held the strings of it in his two fore paws, and went into a warren where was great abundance of rabbits. He put bran and sow-thistle into his bag, and stretching himself out at length, as if he had been dead, he waited for some young rabbit, not yet acquainted with the deceits of the world, to come and rummage his bag for what he had put into it. Scarce was he lain down, but he had what he wanted; a rash and foolish young rabbit jumped into his bag, and Monsieur Puss, immediately drawing close the strings, took and killed him without pity. Proud of his prey, he went with it to the palace, and asked to speak with his Majesty. He was shewed up stairs into the King's apartment, and, making a low reverence, said to him: "I have brought you, sir, a rabbit of the warren which my noble lord the Marquis of Carabas" (for that was the title which Puss was pleased to give his master) "has commanded me to present to your Majesty from him." "Tell thy master," said the King, "that I thank him, and that he does me a great deal of pleasure." Another time he went and hid himself among some standing corn, holding still his bag open; and when a brace of partridges ran into it, he drew the strings, and so caught them both. He went and made a present of these to the[71] King, as he had done before of the rabbit which he took in the warren. The King in like manner received the partridges with great pleasure, and ordered him some money to drink. The Cat continued for two or three months, thus to carry his Majesty, from time to time, game of his master's taking. One day in particular, when he knew for certain that the King was to take the air, along the river side, with his daughter, the most beautiful Princess in the world, he said to his master: "If you will follow my advice, your fortune is made; you have nothing else to do, but go and wash yourself in the river, in that part I shall shew you, and leave the rest to me." The Marquis of Carabas did what the Cat advised him to, without knowing why or wherefore. While he was washing, the King passed by, and the Cat began to cry out, as loud as he could: "Help, help, my lord Marquis of Carabas is drowning." At this noise the King put his head out of his coach-window, and finding it was the Cat who had so often brought him such good game, he commanded his guards to run immediately to the assistance of his lordship the Marquis of Carabas. While they were drawing the poor Marquis out of the river, the Cat came up to the coach, and told the King that while his master was washing, there came by some rogues, who went off with his clothes, tho' he had cried out "Thieves, thieves," several times, as loud as he could. This cunning[72] Cat had hidden them under a great stone. The King immediately commanded the officers of his wardrobe to run and fetch one of his best suits for the lord Marquis of Carabas. http://www.gutenberg.org/files/29021/29021-h/29021-h.htm#The_Master_Cat_or_Puss_in_Boots

Maya the Bee - Bedtime Story (BedtimeStory.TV)

Bedtime Stories for Children (http://www.BedtimeStory.TV) | Best Children Classics HD Subscribe! https://goo.gl/1jQI2H / Play all Stories : http://goo.gl/aekZs1 Download ann play colorings : http://coloring.bedtimestory.tv YouTube channel : http://www.youtube.com/story Maya the Bee Maya is a bee born in a bee hive during internal unrest: the hive is dividing itself into two new colonies. Maya is raised by her teacher, Mrs. Cassandra. Despite Mrs. Cassandra's warnings, Maya wants to explore the wide world and commits the unforgivable crime of leaving the hive. During her adventures, Maya, now in exile, befriends other insects and braves dangers with them. In the climax of the book, Maya is taken prisoner by hornets, the bees' sworn enemies. Prisoner of the hornets, Maya learns of a hornet plan to attack her native hive. Maya is faced with the decision to either return to hive and suffer her due punishment, saving the hive, or leaving the plan unannounced, saving herself but destroying the hive. As may be expected, Maya, after severe pondering, makes the decision to return. In the hive, she announces the coming attack and is, totally unexpectedly, pardoned. The forewarned bees triumph over the hornet attack force. Maya, now a heroine of the hive, becomes a teacher, like Mrs. Cassandra and shares her experiences and wisdom with the future generation. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maya_the_Bee

Bedtime Stories for Children (http://www.BedtimeStory.TV) | Best Children Classics HD
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YouTube channel : http://www.youtube.com/story

In the original tale, a proud town mouse visits his cousin in the country. The country mouse offers the city mouse a meal of simple country cuisine, at which the visitor scoffs and invites the country mouse back to the city for a taste of the "fine life" and the two cousins dine like emperors. But their rich and delicious metropolitan feast is interrupted by a couple of dogs which force the rodent cousins to abandon their meal and scurry to safety. After this, the country mouse decides to return home, preferring security to opulence or, as the 13th-century preacher Odo of Cheriton phrased it, "I'd rather gnaw a bean than be gnawed by continual fear".[2]
The story was widespread in Classical times and there is an early Greek version by Babrius (Fable 108).[3] Horace included it as part of one of his satires (II.6), ending on this story in a poem comparing town living unfavourably with life in the country.[4] However, it seems to have been the 12th century Anglo-Norman writer Walter of England who contributed most to the spread of the fable throughout medieval Europe. His Latin version[5] (or that of Odo of Cheriton) has been credited as the source of the fable that appeared in the Spanish Libro de Buen Amor of Juan Ruiz in the first half of the 14th century.[6] Walter was also the source for several manuscript collections of Aesop's fables in Italian[7] and equally of the popular Esopi fabulas by Accio Zucca, the first printed collection of Aesop's fables in that language (Verona, 1479), in which the story of the town mouse and the country mouse appears as fable 12. This consists of two sonnets, the first of which tells the story and the second contains a moral reflection.

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