Piaget's Stages of Development

author misssmith891   8 год. назад
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How to Stop Back Talk and Get Kids to Listen

http://cooperativekids.com In this video clip, parenting expert and show host, Bill Corbett, explains the number one reason why kids don't cooperate, listen better and talk back. He offers parents and teachers an easy-to-implement technique for improving children's behavior. Creating Cooperative Kids is a one-hour public access television show that provide education and guidance to caregivers of children from 18 months to 18 years of age. Each episode features parenting experts and step-by-step instructions for parents on raising high self-esteem and cooperative kids. See the entire episode at http://www.TheParentingShow.tv. The show's host, Bill Corbett, is the author of the award-winning parenting book series, LOVE, LIMITS, & LESSONS: A PARENT'S GUIDE TO RAISING COOPERATIVE KIDS (in English and in Spanish). He sits on the board of the Network Against Domestic Abuse, the Resource Advisory Committee for Attachment Parenting International, and the management team of the Springfield Parent Academy. Bill's practical experience comes as a father of three grown children, a grandfather of two, and a stepdad to three. He resides with his wife Elizabeth and teenage step daughter Olivia. You can get FREE parenting advice from him at http://www.CooperativeKids.com.

Babies on the Brink

Since the 1960s, developmental psychologists point to the "Visual Cliff"—an experiment that plops babies on a fake precipice—as proof that infants learn to fear heights as they learn to crawl. Yet, over the past 25 years, a series of rigorous (and adorable) experiments by Karen Adolph of NYU's Infant Action Lab has shattered this myth, revealing that while babies can learn from experiences near high ledges or narrow bridges, it's not a phobia they acquire. Produced by Luke Groskin Starring Derek Hough, Tessa Rose Confessore, and Clarabelle Kaufman Music by Audio Network Footage Stills and Additional Footage provided by Karen Adolph and the NYU Infant Action Lab, Eleanor Gibson and R.D. Walk KTCA Twin Cities Public Television Ira Flatow Glacier National Park (C.C. 3.0)

Piaget's Theory of Cognitive Development

Piaget's theory argues that we have to conquer 4 stages of cognitive development: 1. Sensori-Motor Stage 2. Pre-Operational Stage 3. Concrete Operational Stage 4. Formal Operational Stage Only once we have gone through all the stages, at what age can vary, we are able to reach full human intelligence. Special thanks for our patroeon supporters: Ville Medeiros, Chutimon Nuangnit, Cedric Wang, Mike, Eva Marie Koblin, Julien Dumesnil, Mathis and the others. You are amazing !!! Join our supporters and help us reach students and teachers worldwide with friendly videos that explain difficult tings simply. Subscribe to our channel, write a comment or support us as a Patron: www.patreon.com/sprouts Sources: https://www.biography.com/people/jean-piaget-9439915 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Piaget https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piaget%27s_theory_of_cognitive_development http://www.appsychology.com/Book/Developmental/cognitivedevelopment.htm Full Script: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1RAeKhw_9Q5DNiftYLyoV8hmCkLjec1za143sGZLxrEw/edit?usp=sharing

Amazing 17 months old baby!

Elizabeth is so amazing, she is only 17 months old and guess! she can read!

Toddlers regulate their behavior to avoid making adults angry

Toddlers who overhear adults disagreeing can use that emotional information to guide their own behavior, according to research study from the Institute of Learning & Brain Sciences. Learn more about the study here: http://ilabs.washington.edu/i-labs-news/infant-control-thyself This re-enactment of the experiment begins with a warm-up trial as an experimenter shows a toy to a 15-month-old boy and then he gets a chance to play with them. Then a second adult, the "Emoter," enters the room. The experimenter shows her how to play with a toy, a strand of beads that make a rattling sound when dropped into a plastic cup. The Emoter calls these actions "aggravating" and "annoying." When the child has a chance to play with the beads and cup while the Emoter watches with a neutral facial expression, he doesn’t play with the toy. This demonstrates that he’s using the emotional information to regulate his own behavior. The experiment was published in the October/November 2014 issue of the journal Cognitive Development with the title, "Infant, control thyself: Infants' integration of multiple social cues to regulate their imitative behavior." Credit: Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, University of Washington."

This is a collection of clips demonstrating Piaget's Stages of development. For Health and Social Care and Psychology.

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