Cocos Island: Paradise Found

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The deep ocean is the final frontier on planet Earth

The ocean covers 70% of our planet. The deep-sea floor is a realm that is largely unexplored, but cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to go deeper than ever before. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Beneath the waves is a mysterious world that takes up to 95% of Earth's living space. Only three people have ever reached the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean. The deep is a world without sunlight, of freezing temperatures, and immense pressure. It's remained largely unexplored until now. Cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to explore deeper than ever before. They are opening up a whole new world of potential benefits to humanity. The risks are great, but the rewards could be greater. From a vast wealth of resources to clues about the origins of life, the race is on to the final frontier The Okeanos Explorer, the American government state-of-the-art vessel, designed for every type of deep ocean exploration from discovering new species to investigating shipwrecks. On board, engineers and scientists come together to answer questions about the origins of life and human history. Today the Okeanos is on a mission to investigate the wreck of a World War one submarine. Engineer Bobby Moore is part of a team who has developed the technology for this type of mission. The “deep discover”, a remote operating vehicle is equipped with 20 powerful LED lights and designed to withstand the huge pressure four miles down. Equivalent to 50 jumbo jets stacked on top of a person While the crew of the Okeanos send robots to investigate the deep, some of their fellow scientists prefer a more hands-on approach. Doctor Greg stone is a world leading marine biologist with over 8,000 hours under the sea. He has been exploring the abyss in person for 30 years. The technology opening up the deep is also opening up opportunity. Not just to witness the diversity of life but to glimpse vast amounts of rare mineral resources. Some of the world's most valuable metals can be found deep under the waves. A discovery that has begun to pique the interest of the global mining industry. The boldest of mining companies are heading to the deep drawn by the allure of a new Gold Rush. But to exploit it they're also beating a path to another strange new world. In an industrial estate in the north of England, SMD is one of the world's leading manufacturers of remote underwater equipment. The industrial technology the company has developed has made mining possible several kilometers beneath the ocean surface. With an estimated 150 trillion dollars’ worth of gold alone, deep-sea mining has the potential to transform the global economy. With so much still to discover, mining in the deep ocean could have unknowable impact. It's not just life today that may need protecting; reaching the deep ocean might just allow researchers to answer some truly fundamental questions. Hydrothermal vents, hot springs on the ocean floor, are cracks in the Earth's crust. Some claim they could help scientists glimpse the origins of life itself. We might still be years away from unlocking the mysteries of the deep. Even with the latest technology, this kind of exploration is always challenging. As the crew of the Okeanos comes to terms with a scale of the challenge and the opportunity that lies beneath, what they and others discover could transform humanity's understanding of how to protect the ocean. It's the most hostile environment on earth, but the keys to our future may lie in the deep. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist

Big Engines Starting Up

This video features Big Engine Start Up compilation If you wanna see some biggest engine sin the world watch this video and if you like the video hit the like button. We do NOT own the video materials and all credits belong to respectful owners. In case of copyright issues, please contact us immediately for further credits or clip delete. DISCLAIMER: Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing." The materials are used for illustrative and exemplification reasons, also quoting in order to recombine elements to make a new work.

Top 10 Places No Human Has Ever Set Foot on Earth

Some people may believe that the whole earth has been explored by now. There are in fact still places on earth that remain unexplored. The following are some places that you will almost certainly never get to go to, even if you really wanted to. Subscribe for more! ► http://bit.ly/BeAmazedSubscribe ◄ Stay updated ► http://bit.ly/BeAmazedFacebook https://twitter.com/BeAmazedVideos https://instagram.com/BeAmazedVideos ◄ For copyright queries or general inquiries please get in touch: beamazedvideos@gmail.com Credit: https://pastebin.com/yLkDwWwh Be Amazed at these Top 10 Places No Human Has Ever Set Foot on Earth! Siberian Sakha Republic - The Siberian Sakha Republic covers about twenty percent of Russia. Vale Do Javari, Brazil - This next one refers to a place that no modern, civilized human has ever set foot. The Mariana Trench - The Mariana Trench is the deepest point in the entire ocean. Gangkhar Puensum - Gangkhar Puensum, meaning "White Peak of the Three Spiritual Brothers", is the highest unclimbed mountain in the world, and the fortieth highest mountain overall. Star Mountains - The Star Mountains are an enormous mountain range in Papa New Guinea that stretches all the way from the country’s border with Indonesia to the Hindenburg Range – a neighboring mountain range with a less cool name. Yucatan Cenotes - The Yucatan Cenotes are a large cave network located in Mexico.A ‘cenote’ is a particular type of cave that is formed when limestone bedrock collapses. Tsingy De Bemaraha National Park - Tsingy De Bemaraha National Park is located on the western edge of Madagascar. Greenland - Despite being, you know, a country, there are large parts of Greenland that are unexplored. The Namib Desert - You may want to bring at least one water bottle if you decide to go explore the Namib desert, as the region, one of the most arid in the world, gets only two millimeters of rain on average every year. North Sentinel Island - North Sentinel Island tops this list because, of all these places, it is the one I would most strongly advice against visiting.

Denmark to Iceland ferry trip on MS Norrona

Ferry trip from Hirtshals ferry terminal, Denmark to Seyðisfjörður, Iceland via Torshavn, Faroe Islands. Also includes a quick 'look around' in Torshavn as Norrona was there for a few hours. Links: Hiking up Slættaratindur on Eysturoy http://www.infaroe.com/highest-mountain/ Visit Seyðisfjörður http://www.visitseydisfjordur.com/ Piraeus to Santorini ferry trip on Blue Star Delos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DeYXNlRiOfQ Helsinki to Stockholm ferry trip on Viking Line's Gabriella https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gm58LtSjyKQ&t=183s Stockholm to Riga ferry trip on Tallink's Isabelle https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=itTbt292kag Map: Taken from google maps Music: Pioneer, taken from the youtube creators library

17 Most Unreal Rock Formations

Tourist from all over the world travel to these amazing destinations to see the strange but beautiful rock formations nature has made. Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr #10 Salt Piles at Salar de Uyuni Salar de Uyuni, the world’s largest salt flat, is one of the most distinct natural landmarks in the world. The immense plains of salt are viewable from space and are a huge attraction for tourists and photographers. After rainfall, the plains turn into an enormous reflective mirror that creates a surreal landscape. The piles of salt ready for harvest only add to the uncanny imagery. # 9 Giant’s Causeway The Giant’s Causeway is a huge oceanside area in Northern Ireland comprised of giant interlocking columns of basalt rock. Most of the columns are hexagonal in shape and perfectly fit together creating a surreal almost game-like environment. Scientifically speaking the columns were created by an ancient volcanic explosion, but it gains its name from the popular legend that the cliffs were built as a causeway by a giant in ancient times. # 8 Balance Rock In the Garden of Gods in Colorado Springs there are a plethora of beautiful red rock formations, but possibly the most iconic of these rocks is Balance Rock - a huge boulder that seems like it could fall over at any moment. It is destined to fall over eventually when erosion or another damage dislodges it from its gripping points. Go and see Balance Rock before it falls over and becomes just a normal rock. # 7 Balancing Rock, Canada There is another precarious rock, but this seems to be even more impossible. The Balancing Rock in Nova Scotia is believed to be standing for thousands of years. It’s about 30 feet tall and seems to be just standing straight up out of pure will. # 6 Fly Geyser This erupting rock is Fly Geyser, an accidental man-made geothermal geyser in Washoe County. The fountain was created in 1964 when people were exploring sources of geothermal energy and accidentally drilled into a well. The well was never capped properly and has now become a geyser that shoots water into the air, creating the ever growing rock formation around it. It looks like a weird alien structure because of thermophilic algae that thrive in the high temperatures Fly Geyser generates. # 5 Split Apple Rock Tokangawhā, aka Split Apple Rock, is a geological rock formation off the coast of South Island of New Zealand. It is a structure made of granite and looks almost like it was deliberately cut in half. This cleft was natural, though, with no help from any humans. What exactly could have cut this boulder in half is a mystery although theories include water creeping into the rock, freezing, and expanding to break the rock. It’s a popular spot for tourists to take the exact same photo every year. # 4 Moeraki Boulders The Moeraki Boulders are unusually large and spherical boulders that are spread along Koekohe Beach on the Otago coast of New Zealand. Local Maori legends explain the boulders as the remains of eel baskets from the large sailing canoe that brought Maori people to the island hundreds of years ago. These stones are usually hollow but sometimes they are filled with calcite and quartz, which makes it look very interesting when they are broken open or exposed. # 3 Folding Rocks at Agia Pavlos These interesting looking rocks are known commonly as the Folding Rocks. They are sedimentary limestone layers were once layered horizontally at the bottom of the sea, but tectonic plates pushed them together and forced them upwards. # 2 Torghatten Torghatten is a granite mountain on Torget island in Norway. As far as mountains go it looks pretty uncharacteristic and lumpy except for the giant gaping hole right in the middle of it. According to legend, the mountain hole was made by a troll who was chasing a beautiful girl. Knowing he could never catch the girl he shot an arrow at her, but the Troll King threw his hat to save her and that hat turned into the mountain. Sounds pretty legit to me. # 1 Abandoned Russian Salt Mine This abandoned Russian Salt Mine looks more like a scene from a trippy art house movie. The naturally occurring minerals in the abandoned mine create psychedelic patterns and structures which create unique swirls. While the naturally occurring art in these walls are beautiful, exploring the mines are not without danger. There are hazards of falling, landslides, and low visibility, but it might be worth facing to see this one of a kind place.

A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Costa Rica’s stunning and biologically-diverse Cocos Island was also the inspiration for Michael Crichton’s Jurassic Park. Join Alucia’s expedition to this global treasure and take an unprecedented aerial look at this incredible island.

Production Crew:
Director: Mark Dalio
Director of Photography: Erik Rochner
Cineflex Operator: Ron Chapple
Production Manager: Audrey Costadina
Editor: Ryan Quinn
Executive Producer: David Hamlin

#CocosIsland #JurassicPark #AerialFootage #ScienceExploration #NatureVideography #DiscoverEarth #FilmProduction #NatureFootage

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