Introducing OceanX and Alucia2

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The deep ocean is the final frontier on planet Earth

The ocean covers 70% of our planet. The deep-sea floor is a realm that is largely unexplored, but cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to go deeper than ever before. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Beneath the waves is a mysterious world that takes up to 95% of Earth's living space. Only three people have ever reached the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean. The deep is a world without sunlight, of freezing temperatures, and immense pressure. It's remained largely unexplored until now. Cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to explore deeper than ever before. They are opening up a whole new world of potential benefits to humanity. The risks are great, but the rewards could be greater. From a vast wealth of resources to clues about the origins of life, the race is on to the final frontier The Okeanos Explorer, the American government state-of-the-art vessel, designed for every type of deep ocean exploration from discovering new species to investigating shipwrecks. On board, engineers and scientists come together to answer questions about the origins of life and human history. Today the Okeanos is on a mission to investigate the wreck of a World War one submarine. Engineer Bobby Moore is part of a team who has developed the technology for this type of mission. The “deep discover”, a remote operating vehicle is equipped with 20 powerful LED lights and designed to withstand the huge pressure four miles down. Equivalent to 50 jumbo jets stacked on top of a person While the crew of the Okeanos send robots to investigate the deep, some of their fellow scientists prefer a more hands-on approach. Doctor Greg stone is a world leading marine biologist with over 8,000 hours under the sea. He has been exploring the abyss in person for 30 years. The technology opening up the deep is also opening up opportunity. Not just to witness the diversity of life but to glimpse vast amounts of rare mineral resources. Some of the world's most valuable metals can be found deep under the waves. A discovery that has begun to pique the interest of the global mining industry. The boldest of mining companies are heading to the deep drawn by the allure of a new Gold Rush. But to exploit it they're also beating a path to another strange new world. In an industrial estate in the north of England, SMD is one of the world's leading manufacturers of remote underwater equipment. The industrial technology the company has developed has made mining possible several kilometers beneath the ocean surface. With an estimated 150 trillion dollars’ worth of gold alone, deep-sea mining has the potential to transform the global economy. With so much still to discover, mining in the deep ocean could have unknowable impact. It's not just life today that may need protecting; reaching the deep ocean might just allow researchers to answer some truly fundamental questions. Hydrothermal vents, hot springs on the ocean floor, are cracks in the Earth's crust. Some claim they could help scientists glimpse the origins of life itself. We might still be years away from unlocking the mysteries of the deep. Even with the latest technology, this kind of exploration is always challenging. As the crew of the Okeanos comes to terms with a scale of the challenge and the opportunity that lies beneath, what they and others discover could transform humanity's understanding of how to protect the ocean. It's the most hostile environment on earth, but the keys to our future may lie in the deep. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist

The Deepest Dive in Antarctica Reveals a Sea Floor Teeming With Life

Follow us for more ocean exploration: http://www.instagram.com/oceanx http://www.Facebook.com/oceanxorg http://www.twitter.com/oceanx No one really knows what’s in the deep ocean in Antarctica. Now we have the technology to reach into the ocean depths, we accompanied scientist and deep-sea explorer Jon Copley and became the first to descend to 1000 meters underwater in Antarctica for Blue Planet II. The exotic creatures we found there will astonish you. This video is a part of Our Blue Planet, a joint venture between Alucia Productions and BBC Earth to get people talking about the ocean. Join the conversation on Twitter: @OurBluePlanet. Director: Mark Dalio Director of Photography (AP): Janssen Powers Director of Photography (BBC): Ted Giffords 2nd Camera/Drone Op: James DuBourdieu Field Audio: Mike Kasic Production Manager: Samantha Loshiavo Associate Producer: Marjorie Crowley Editors: Ryan Quinn, Brian Golding, Janssen Powers Colorist: James DuBourdieu Sound Re-recording Mixer: Ryan Quinn Assistant Editor: Jorge Alvarez Post Production Supervisor: Brian Golding Executive Producer: Jennifer Hile

Bikini Atoll: Into The Atomic Abyss

In the years after World War II, the Marshall Islands’ remote Bikini Atoll lit up with some of the most powerful nuclear tests ever conducted. These blasts left behind the wreckage of more than 70 Japanese and American warships which rest on the ocean floor to this day. Join the ALUCIA sub team as they explore these haunting ghosts of the Nuclear Age. Production Crew: Director: Mark Dalio Field Producer: Ian Kellett Underwater Camera: Steve Hudson Editor: Ryan Quinn Supervising Producer: Jennifer Hile Executive Producer: David Hamlin #BikiniAtoll #SubDive #ShipWreck #WW2 #Submarine #OceanExploration #DiscoverEarth

10 Animals People Forced Into EXTINCTION!

Check out these 10 animals people forced into extinction! This top 10 list of amazing wild animals that were hunted into extinction and are no longer around will make you lose faith in humanity! Subscribe For New Videos! http://goo.gl/UIzLeB Watch our "STRANGEST Artifacts Ever Discovered!" video here: https://youtu.be/gG0XGt3jFZA Watch our "SECRETS Casinos DON'T Want You To Find Out!" video here: https://youtu.be/hAoABuvzOZM Watch our "RAREST And Most EXPENSIVE Cars In The World!" video here: https://youtu.be/MtCnWSqqilg 10. Mosquitoes If there’s one species that annoys the heck out of everyone it’s the mosquito, right? They not only give us irritating bites and buzz in your ear, but they can also transmit diseases like malaria, dengue, West Nile virus, and much more. In fact mosquitoes are responsible for killing almost 1 million people a year…this is no joke. 9. Passenger Pigeon The passenger pigeon has been extinct since 1914 but the passenger pigeon made a big impact on history. They used to be found in the billions in North America and were noted for their red chests and tails which were shaped like wedges. Everything was going great until one thing happened… the invention of the telegraph in the mid 1800s. 8. Western Black Rhinoceros This subspecies of the black rhino was officially declared extinct in 2011. The Western black rhinoceros used to be a stunning feature of African wildlife. Sadly like many of its kind it was killed by poachers for its horn, which some believed had medicinal properties. But others just like having the horn on display for status purposes. You know, something to talk about with your friends. 7. The Dodo Bird Everyone’s heard of the dodo right? It even made an appearance in ‘Alice In Wonderland’…? Well in case you haven’t, it was a goofy-looking thing, it couldn’t fly and was apparently extremely delicious. It became extinct when sailors landed on the island of Mauritius in the Indian Ocean in the late 16th century. The hungry Dutchmen kept on eating the dodo until there was nothing left! 6. Pyrenean Ibex In this case, we have a d-extinction? Thanks to science, extinction can be reversed and an interesting example of this was the Pyrenean Ibex, a wild goat that also has the Spanish title ‘bucardo’. These hardy little guys used to roam the Iberian Peninsula. Their distinctive horns were thick and curved on the males and shorter and thin on the females. 5. La Pinta Island tortoise La Pinta Island is part of the legendary Galapagos Islands in Ecuador. These islands were immortalized by Charles Darwin when he used the wildlife there as inspiration for the theory of evolution we still rely on today. Also known as ‘Abingdon Island’, La Pinta played host to a giant species of tortoise. 4. Quagga Until the late 1800s quaggas were a common sight in South Africa. A quagga was essentially a zebra only with a brown bottom half. It was a subspecies of the plains zebra and fell prey to hunters, who killed so many they wiped them off the map. For over a hundred years Mankind never saw a live quagga but then The Quagga Project started. 3. Tasmanian Tiger This Tasmanian Tiger isn’t exactly a tiger, it just got called that because of its stripes. The correct name was ‘thylacine’ and it was actually a large marsupial like a kangaroo. It also lived on the Australian mainland as well as Tasmania. 2. Steller’s Sea Cow If any species had it rough it was the Steller’s sea cow. This also includes manatees. Named after George W. Steller, the naturalist who discovered them in 1741, they were part of the ecosystem on the Komander Islands in the Bering Sea. 1. Great Auk The big name when it comes to extinct species is probably the Great Auk. It’s been referred to as the “original penguin” and you can see why. It’s black and white, short and it can’t fly. Look at that huge beak too. This little bird wouldn’t look out of place in ‘Happy Feet’. Origins Explained is the place to be to find all the answers to your questions, from mysterious events and unsolved mysteries to everything there is to know about the world and its amazing animals!

Evolution In Action: Jellyfish Lake

The ALUCIA’s quest for discovery landed us in the mountainous jungles of Indonesia’s Raja Ampat’s Islands, where inland marine lakes are allowing scientists to unlock mysteries of marine evolution. Watch as the team treks to a hidden lake to observe and sample rare subspecies of jellyfish found nowhere else on the planet. Production Crew: Field Producer/2nd Camera: Ian Kellett Underwater Cinematographer: Ernie Kovacs Topside Cinematographer: Andy Maser Editor: Steve Evans Assistant Editor: Stephanie Crane Supervising Producer: Jennifer Hile Executive Producer: David Hamlin Creative Director: Mark Dalio #RajaAmpat #JellyfishLake #Jellyfish #ScienceExploration #NatureVideography #DiscoverEarth #FilmProduction #NatureFootage

OceanX is a mission to enable explorers and researchers to explore the unseen ocean, map uncharted areas of the world, observe rare deep-sea creatures, and pursue scientific and medical breakthroughs—and then bring all of these wonders back to the wider world.

All of this will be created aboard the most advanced science and media vessel ever built, the M/V Alucia2, debuting in early 2019 and building on the legacy of OceanX’s current marine research vessel, the M/V #Alucia.

The Alucia2 will feature state-of-the-art onboard dry and wet marine research labs, cutting-edge media equipment and a top-of-the-line production and media center, manned and autonomous deep-sea submersibles and helicopters and drones.

Alucia2’s filmmaking capabilities have been developed in consultation with filmmaker and ocean explorer James Cameron, and the ship has been designed by Hollywood’s leading studio production engineers.

Exploration is the key to ending ignorance about our oceans, which is the main threat to their existence.

“With OceanX and Alucia2,” says James Cameron, “we will reignite global passion for and curiosity about the ocean in our global, digitally-connected age.”

Explore with us: @oceanx / #oceanx

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