Uncovering Manta Ray Secrets

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Mysterious Islands in the Sky Unlock Secrets of Our: Past Return to Tepuis | Short Film Showcase

"Mysterious towering tepuis in South America have been the inspiration for movies such as Avatar and Up, and Arthur Conan Doyle’s novel The Lost World. In this short film adventure from Pongo Media, a team of explorers repels down the mystical mountains of this legendary lost world to uncover evolutionary secrets of some of the most unique ecosystems in the world. Read more about the “Islands in the Sky.” http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/09/130928-tepuis-pebble-toads-biodiversity-evolution-science/ See more from the filmmaker. http://pongomediaproductions.com/ See an interview with filmmaker Joe Riis. http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/short-film-showcase/return-to-the-tepuis-behind-the-scenes-with-filmmaker-joe-riis âž¡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe âž¡ Get More Short Film Showcase: http://bit.ly/Shortfilmshowcase About Short Film Showcase: A curated collection of the most captivating documentary shorts from filmmakers around the world. Know of a great short film that should be part of our Showcase? Email sfs@natgeo.com to submit a video for consideration. See more from National Geographic's Short Film Showcase at http://documentary.com Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Mysterious Islands in the Sky Unlock Secrets of Our Past: Return to Tepuis | Short Film Showcase https://youtu.be/S9K8QcjwjYs National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo"

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5 Methods How To Breathe Underwater Have you tried to hold your breath underwater when you were a kid? Have you ever thought about why you need it? There´s oxygen underwater, why not use it for breathing? CREDIT TO: TREADER TUBE https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCojgigZML_nuNmtqPO-0rqQ Rulof Maker https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5eVAqIMYef7YQ9QrXKpfjA mathisox https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzRKYvYix3EsCJsxb40Dyzw Kulibin TV https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCs7Sp_-bnuFcFu3D-z16acw Vitalik Ignatyuk https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBHwWYrgvBfJi8Je5zNGJJQ Watch Full Video 1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GUtinUtMF1w 2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_kds-mWfR-Y 3.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nfUjCDhFwxk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LR_TKZM_2s4 4. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uTo2acmkoJg 5. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MVdGRyIKT4Y

Bikini Atoll: Into The Atomic Abyss

In the years after World War II, the Marshall Islands’ remote Bikini Atoll lit up with some of the most powerful nuclear tests ever conducted. These blasts left behind the wreckage of more than 70 Japanese and American warships which rest on the ocean floor to this day. Join the ALUCIA sub team as they explore these haunting ghosts of the Nuclear Age. Production Crew: Director: Mark Dalio Field Producer: Ian Kellett Underwater Camera: Steve Hudson Editor: Ryan Quinn Supervising Producer: Jennifer Hile Executive Producer: David Hamlin #BikiniAtoll #SubDive #ShipWreck #WW2 #Submarine #OceanExploration #DiscoverEarth

Kung Fu Mantis Vs Jumping Spider | Life Story | BBC

When attacked an orchid Mantis is capable of it's own self defence in the form of Kung Fu. Taken from Life Story. Subscribe to BBC Earth: http://bit.ly/BBCEarthSubBBC Earth YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/BBCEarth BBC Earth Facebook http://www.facebook.com/bbcearth (ex-UK only) BBC Earth Twitter http://www.twitter.com/bbcearth Visit http://www.bbc.com/earth/world for all the latest animal news and wildlife videos This is a channel from BBC Worldwide, trading as BBC Studios, who help fund new BBC programmes.

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10 Most Dangerous Water Animals In The World ► Subscribe: https://goo.gl/gYLyzW For copyright matters please contact us at: miniminter1992.29@gmail.com There are many different types of creatures that live in streams, lakes, seas and oceans. And while many of these creatures are harmless, there are many that are incredibly dangerous if you happen to have an encounter with them. These dangerous animals lurk beneath the surface of the water in a world vastly different than ours, and must be deadly to survive. Join us as we take a look at 10 of the most dangerous water creatures. 10. Australian Box Jellyfish – This creature is not one to be messed around with if you happen to swim into a swarm of them. And while they may seem harmless, the Australian box jellyfish is considered to be the most venomous marine animal in the world. They have tentacles that are covered with tiny darts called nematocysts, and they are loaded with poison. 9. Flower Urchin – Beautiful but deadly, these sea urchins are extremely venomous. They look like a bouquet of small flowers; to which they get their name from. They feed on invertebrates, sponges, and dead fish, and have well developed jaws for grinding up their prey. 8. The Saltwater Crocodile – Evolving around 200 million years in the Mesozoic epoch, crocodiles have far outlived the dinosaurs. The Salt water crocodile is the world’s largest reptile, and they have been known to grow up to 27 feet long and weigh 2,465 lbs. 7. Textile Cone Snail – Mother nature teaches us that anything in nature that is beautiful, is most likely deadly, and a warning to predators and humans to not touch or disturb them. This holds true for the Textile Cone Snail. 6. The Sea Snake – These highly venomous marine snakes are closely related and belong to the same family as the cobra. There are two independently evolved groups: the true sea snakes which are related to Australian terrestrial elapids, and the sea kraits which are related to Asian cobras. 5. The Lionfish – Lionfish are skilled hunters, using specialized bilateral swim bladder muscles to provide exquisite control of location in the water column, allowing the fish to alter its center of gravity to better attack prey. The lionfish then spreads its large pectoral fins and swallows its prey in a single motion. 4. The Stingray – Stingrays are a group of rays, which are cartilaginous fish related to sharks, and are one of the oceans deadliest creatures. Most stingrays have one or more barbed stingers on their tails, which are used exclusively for self-defense. 3. Blue-Ringed Octopus – This octopus has some of the most striking colors of any ocean creature. They get their name from the brightly blue colored rings on its body. 2. Needlefish – These strange looking creatures are very slender, and have a single dorsal fin, placed far back on the body. Needlefish are capable of making short jumps out of the water at up to 37 mph. Since Needlefish swim near the surface, they often leap over the decks of shallow boats rather than going around. 1. The Moray Eel - Most attacks stem from disruption of a moray's burrow to which they react strongly, but an increasing number of accidents also occur during hand feeding of morays by divers, an activity often used by dive companies to attract tourists.

Manta ray nurseries are among the least-studied marine settings on the planet, never before having been documented in the wild. Follow the ALUCIA team and a talented group of scientists and conservationists on their pioneering exploration of what has now become a legendary global hotspot for locating, tagging, and tracking mantas.

Production Crew:
Field Producer/2nd Camera: Ian Kellett
Underwater Cinematographer: Ernie Kovacs
Topside Cinematographer: Andy Maser
Editor: Steve Evans
Assistant Editor: Stephanie Crane
Supervising Producer: Jennifer Hile
Executive Producer: David Hamlin
Creative Director: Mark Dalio

#MantaRays #ScubaDiving #ScienceExploration #NatureVideography #DiscoverEarth #FilmProduction #NatureFootage

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