How Students Learn: Strategies for Teaching from the Psychology of Learning

author UnivSouthCarolinaCTE   6 год. назад
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How to Learn Anything... Fast - Josh Kaufman

Author and business adviser Josh Kaufman reveals a new approach for acquiring new skills quickly with just a small amount of practice each day. To find out more about this talk, visit the event page on the RSA website: http://www.thersa.org/events/audio-and-past-events/2013/how-to-learn-anything-fast Listen to the podcast of the full event including audience Q&A: http://www.thersa.org/__data/assets/file/0004/1524154/20130604JoshKaufman.mp3 Follow the RSA on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/thersaorg Like the RSA on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/thersaorg Our events are made possible with the support of our Fellowship. Support us by donating or applying to become a Fellow. Donate: http://www.thersa.org/support-the-rsa Become a Fellow: http://www.thersa.org/fellowship/apply

Teaching for Learning

(February 2, 2012) Professor Jennifer Summit discusses recent research on undergraduate literacy and intellectual development. She explores how it can transform university teaching, learning, and disciplinary knowledge. The Center for Teaching and Learning's longest-running lecture series, Award-Winning Teachers on Teaching invites faculty winners of Stanford's major teaching awards to deliver a lecture on a teaching topic of their choice. Stanford University: http://www.stanford.edu/ Center for Teaching and Learning: http://ctl.stanford.edu/ Stanford University Channel on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/stanford

Barbara Oakley: "Learning How to Learn" | Talks at Google

About the Book: Whether you are a student struggling to fulfill a math or science requirement, or you are embarking on a career change that requires a higher level of math competency, A Mind for Numbers offers the tools you need to get a better grasp of that intimidating but inescapable field. Engineering professor Barbara Oakley knows firsthand how it feels to struggle with math. She flunked her way through high school math and science courses, before enlisting in the army immediately after graduation. When she saw how her lack of mathematical and technical savvy severely limited her options—both to rise in the military and to explore other careers—she returned to school with a newfound determination to re-tool her brain to master the very subjects that had given her so much trouble throughout her entire life. In A Mind for Numbers, Dr. Oakley lets us in on the secrets to effectively learning math and science—secrets that even dedicated and successful students wish they’d known earlier. Contrary to popular belief, math requires creative, as well as analytical, thinking. Most people think that there’s only one way to do a problem, when in actuality, there are often a number of different solutions—you just need the creativity to see them. For example, there are more than three hundred different known proofs of the Pythagorean Theorem. In short, studying a problem in a laser-focused way until you reach a solution is not an effective way to learn math. Rather, it involves taking the time to step away from a problem and allow the more relaxed and creative part of the brain to take over. A Mind for Numbers shows us that we all have what it takes to excel in math, and learning it is not as painful as some might think! About the Author: Barbara Oakley is a professor of engineering at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan. She has received many awards for her teaching, including the coveted National Science Foundation New Century Scholar Award.

Theory to Practice: Teaching Critical Thinking

In a global information environment, is answer-finding still the best approach for students to learn? The ability to think critically, applying strategies across situations, is more important than ever before. Teaching critical thinking requires students to explore topics that may not be clearly defined. Such activities require continual synthesis (inductive) and analysis (deductive) practice using many variables. Students ask questions to find answers. Successful instruction in this context requires association between hierarchal learning theory and instructional practice. This workshop relates theory to practice in teaching critical thinking.

How to become a memory master | Idriz Zogaj | TEDxGoteborg

Never miss a talk! SUBSCRIBE to the TEDx channel: http://bit.ly/1FAg8hB Idriz is passionate about teaching others how to improve their memories and believes that with the right practice, almost everyone can get a super-memory.

Abundant research demonstrates that learning takes place when the student's mind actively engages in the material. The major problem is determining how to increase that activity. Within the discipline of human memory, learning, and cognition exists a vast body of literature dealing specifically with this issue. Participants will leave this workshop with an understanding of the basic concepts in human learning, how to present information so that students most effectively encode it into long-term memory, and how to help students know when they know.

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