Evolution In Action: Jellyfish Lake

author OceanX   8 мес. назад
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You're Not Hallucinating. That's Just Squid Skin. | Deep Look

Octopuses and cuttlefish are masters of underwater camouflage, blending in seamlessly against a rock or coral. But squid have to hide in the open ocean, mimicking the subtle interplay of light, water, and waves. How do they do it? (And it is NOT OCTOPI) SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. * NEW VIDEOS EVERY OTHER TUESDAY! * --- How do squid change color? For an animal with such a humble name, market squid have a spectacularly hypnotic appearance. Streaks and waves of color flicker and radiate across their skin. Other creatures may posses the ability to change color, but squid and their relatives are without equal when it comes to controlling their appearance and new research may illuminate how they do it. To control the color of their skin, cephalopods use tiny organs in their skin called chromatophores. Each tiny chromatophore is basically a sac filled with pigment. Minute muscles tug on the sac, spreading it wide and exposing the colored pigment to any light hitting the skin. When the muscles relax, the colored areas shrink back into tiny spots. --- Why do squid change color? Octopuses, cuttlefish and squid belong to a class of animals referred to as cephalopods. These animals, widely regarded as the most intelligent of the invertebrates, use their color change abilities for both camouflage and communication. Their ability to hide is critical to their survival since, with the exception of the nautiluses, these squishy and often delicious animals live without the protection of protective external shells. But squid often live in the open ocean. How do you blend in when there's nothing -- except water -- to blend into? They do it by changing the way light bounces off their their skin -- actually adjust how iridescent their skin is using light reflecting cells called iridophores. They can mimic the way sunlight filters down from the surface. Hide in plain sight. Iridophores make structural color, which means they reflect certain wavelengths of light because of their shape. Most familiar instances of structural color in nature (peacock feathers, mother of pearl) are constant–they may shimmer when you change your viewing angle, but they don't shift from pink to blue. --- Read the article for this video on KQED Science: http://ww2.kqed.org/science/2015/09/08/youre-not-hallucinating-thats-just-squid-skin/ --- More great DEEP LOOK episodes: What Gives the Morpho Butterfly Its Magnificent Blue? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29Ts7CsJDpg Nature's Mood Rings: How Chameleons Really Change Color https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kp9W-_W8rCM Pygmy Seahorses: Masters of Camouflage https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q3CtGoqz3ww --- Related videos from the PBS Digital Studios Network! Cuttlefish: Tentacles In Disguise - It’s Okay to Be Smart https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcwfTOg5rnc Why Neuroscientists Love Kinky Sea Slugs - Gross Science https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QGHiyWjjhHY The Psychology of Colour, Emotion and Online Shopping - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=THTKv6dT8rU --- More KQED SCIENCE: Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science: http://ww2.kqed.org/science Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is supported by HopeLab, The David B. Gold Foundation; S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation; The Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation; The Vadasz Family Foundation; Smart Family Foundation and the members of KQED.

Dive into the Deep Dark Ocean in a High-Tech Submersible!

Come join Greg Foot on a scientific adventure diving down into the deep dark ocean! Starting on the deck of the 'Baseline Explorer', you’ll be lifted out into the waves, you’ll be cleared to dive, then you'll break the surface and head down, further and further, until you reach the side of an underwater volcano 250m under the surface, in the Twilight Zone just off the coast of Bermuda! Your guide is Greg Foot - the Science Guy on Blue Peter and popular host of the YouTube Channel BBC Earth Lab [and lots of other stuff on YouTube, TV, Radio and Stage - More about Greg at www.gregfoot.com]. Greg’s drive was part of ocean charity Nekton's mission to deliver the XL Catlin Deep Ocean Survey. Nekton’s mission is to explore and research the ocean, the planet’s most critical, yet least explored, frontier. More info at www.nektonmission.org Huge thanks to Nekton, XL Catlin, Project Baseline, Triton Submersibles, Global Underwater Explorers and all the crew on the Baseline Explorer. Shot & edited by Greg Foot. Additional footage courtesy of Nekton / XL Catlin Deep Ocean Survey. Thanks also to Alex4D.

Evolution in Action

Clips include: Fish, Amphibians, Reptiles, Dinosaurs, Mammals, Primates. Song: Just Like You Imagined by Nine Inch Nails (remixed for youtube). Source: Walking with Monsters, Walking with Prehistoric Beasts.

See a Sea Turtle Devour a Jellyfish Like Spaghetti | National Geographic

A marine biologist captured footage of a green sea turtle enjoying a stinging meal - a jellyfish. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Jellyfish paralyze prey using neurotoxins in their tentacles, but the turtle does not seem to be affected. It closes its eyes and uses its flipper as a shield from the jellyfish’s stinging tentacles. Green sea turtles are endangered. Their main threat is overexploitation of eggs from the beaches they are laid on. Green sea turtles are predominately herbivorous, but juveniles have been known to feed on jellyfish. Click here to read more about the sea turtle and the jellyfish. http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/06/sea-turtle-eats-jellyfish-video-ecology-marine-spd/ See a Sea Turtle Devour a Jellyfish Like Spaghetti | National Geographic https://youtu.be/PA66nEJYaAU National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

SUPER ANIMALS - SUPER JELLYFISH

The thought of flies, roaches, bats, worms, or jellyfish often evoke in us unpleasant or disgusting feelings... Yet, these animals possess extraordinary characteristics that deserve a closer look at what they represent and what they have done for science.

The ALUCIA’s quest for discovery landed us in the mountainous jungles of Indonesia’s Raja Ampat’s Islands, where inland marine lakes are allowing scientists to unlock mysteries of marine evolution. Watch as the team treks to a hidden lake to observe and sample rare subspecies of jellyfish found nowhere else on the planet.

Production Crew:
Field Producer/2nd Camera: Ian Kellett
Underwater Cinematographer: Ernie Kovacs
Topside Cinematographer: Andy Maser
Editor: Steve Evans
Assistant Editor: Stephanie Crane
Supervising Producer: Jennifer Hile
Executive Producer: David Hamlin
Creative Director: Mark Dalio

#RajaAmpat #JellyfishLake #Jellyfish #ScienceExploration #NatureVideography #DiscoverEarth #FilmProduction #NatureFootage

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